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Phylogenetic Analysis of Late Cenozoic Tapirus (Mammalia, Perissodactyla)

Supplementary Data for poster presentation by R. C. Hulbert, Jr. and S. C. Wallace at the 2005 Society of Vertebrate Paleontology meeting in Mesa, Arizona.

Late Miocene Tapirus from Florida

Download a copy of 2005 research paper by R. C. Hulbert published in the Bulletin of the Florida Museum of Natural History. This work includes the description of a new species, Tapirus webbi.

Tapirus polkensis from Florida and Tennessee

Tapirus polkensis is the smallest American species in the genus (either fossil or living), with an estimated body mass of 125 kilograms. It is known from the late Miocene and early Pliocene of central Florida and the late Miocene of eastern Tennessee. The species name comes from Polk County, Florida, where the first specimens where found. But the largest concentration of fossils is from the Gray Site in Tennessee, which has produced over 80 individuals, the largest number of tapirs ever found at one fossil site. Hulbert and co-authors (2009, Journal of Paleontology) described in detail its skull, mandible, and teeth. You can also request either a pdf or a printed reprint of the published paper from Richard Hulbert.

New species of Tapirus from the early Pleistocene of Florida

Download a copy of 2010 research paper by R. C. Hulbert published in the Bulletin of the Florida Museum of Natural History. This work includes the description of Tapirus lundeliusi and a review of all tapirs from the Blancan Land Mammal Age known from Florida.