Southern cricket frog

Southern cricket frog (Acris gryllus). Florida Museum photo by Kenneth Krysko

Standing outside at night anywhere in rural Florida means you’re likely hearing frogs calling. Some species are comfortable in urban areas as well.

If you learn to pick out the species of frogs (and toads), you can quickly know a lot about the habitat, the season and even the individual’s personal message. They call out for breeding purposes, to mark territory, to alert each other about predators and in response to the weather.

Here are many (not all) of Florida’s frogs by voice, plus a bonus of seasonal choruses. (Audio from “Florida Frog Calls” by Florida Museum of Natural History.)

Barking Treefrog (Chorus)  | Learn more about this frog

Bird-voiced Treefrog  | Learn more about this frog

Bronze Frog

Carpenter Frog

Cope’s Gray Treefrog (Mating Call)

Cope’s Gray Treefrog (Rain Call)

Eastern Narrow-mouth Toad | Learn more about this toad

Gopher Frog

Green Treefrog | Learn more about this frog

Green Treefrog (Chorus) | Learn more about this frog

Green Treefrog (Rain Call) | Learn more about this frog

Little Grass Frog

Little Grass Frog (Rhythmic)

Oak Toad (Breeding Call)

Ornate Chorus Frog | Learn more about this frog

Pig Frog

Pinewoods Treefrog  | Learn more about this frog

Pinewoods Treefrog (Chorus)  | Learn more about this frog

Southern Chorus Frog | Learn more about this frog

Southern Cricket Frog | Learn more about this frog

Southern Cricket Frog (Chorus) | Learn more about this frog

Southern Leopard Frog | Learn more about this frog

Southern Toad (Breeding Chorus) | Learn more about this toad

Spring Peeper  | Learn more about this frog

Spring Peeper (Chorus Mating Call) | Learn more about this frog

Squirrel Treefrog  | Learn more about this frog

Squirrel Treefrog (Chorus)  | Learn more about this frog

Group Chorus

Because a frog chorus is often several species singing together, and the variety changes with the season, here are a few choruses to enjoy. See if you can identify the individual species in each season!

Spring

Summer (July)

Summer (August)

Winter

Author

By Radha Krueger

• Learn more about the Herpetology Collection at the Florida Museum.

Tags