Nathalis iole

  • Family name: Pieridae/Whites and Sulphurs
  • General description: yellow; forewing with black apex and black bar along trailing margin. Hindwing yellow with black along leading margin; female hindwing with orange flush and more extensive black markings. Ventral forewing with round black submarginal spot and orange scaling along costal margin. Ventral hindwing yellow with olive scaling, more prominent in winter form (dry season) individuals.
  • Field Marks: small; yellow forewing with black apex and black bar along trailing margin; ventral forewing with round black spot and orange scaling along costal margin
  • Sexes: appear similar
  • Wingspan: 20-30 mm
  • Life Cycle: Egg: yellow, spindle-shaped, laid singly on host leaves Mature larva: green with narrow purple dorsal stripe and pale lateral stripe Chrysalis: green
  • Number of Generations: multiple
  • Flight Season: All year
  • Abundance: Common
  • Habitat: disturbed sites, weedy fields, roadsides
  • Counties: Alachua, Baker, Bay, Bradford, Brevard, Broward, Calhoun, Charlotte, Citrus, Clay, Collier, Columbia, De Soto, Dixie, Duval, Escambia, Flagler, Franklin, Gadsden, Gilchrist, Glades, Gulf, Hamilton, Hardee, Hendry, Hernando, Highlands, Hillsborough, Holmes, Indian River, Jackson, Jefferson, Lafayette, Lake, Lee, Leon, Levy, Liberty, Madison, Manatee, Marion, Martin, Miami-Dade, Monroe, Nassau, Okaloosa, Okeechobee, Orange, Osceola, Palm Beach, Pasco, Pinellas, Polk, Putnam, Santa Rosa, Sarasota, Seminole, St. Johns, St. Lucie, Sumter, Suwannee, Taylor, Union, Volusia, Wakulla, Walton, Washington
  • Larval Host Plants: Spanish needles (Bidens alba), carpetweed (Mullogo verticillata)
  • Similar Species:
  • Additional Information: Frequently colonizes northern portions of Florida. Range is limited in Indiana and Wyoming.

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